miller-dd

miller-ddD. D. Miller is originally from Nova Scotia but has lived, worked and studied all across the country. His work has appeared in a number of journals and anthologies including The Malahat Review, The Fiddlehead, Eleven Eleven: Journal of Literature and Art and Dinosaur Porn. As the Derby Nerd, Miller is known around North America for his writing and commentary on roller derby, one of the world’s fastest growing sports.

A graduate of Mount Allison University, the University of Victoria and the University of Guelph (where he completed his MFA), Miller currently lives in Toronto where he works as a college English instructor.

David Foster Wallace Ruined My Suicide and Other Stories is his first book.

kittredge-fox-lynne

kittredge-fox-lynneLynne Kittredge-Fox is a creative writer who draws inspiration from those things she loves the most: children, music, and nature. A life-long resident of Dundas, Ontario, Lynne runs a successful daycare where storytelling plays an important role. It is while working with the children that Lynne was first inspired to write her first story, collaborating with Canadian artist and musician Tom Wilson for the children’s book The Mighty Moon King.

After the success of The Mighty Moon King, Lynne put pen to paper again to write Meatball Love and the Spaghetti Tree, and The Jungle Valley Jamboree. Lynne is excited to have more projects on the go, with plans set for at least three more books. A second installment with Tom Wilson as artist, entitled “The Grand Abyss Princess” is slated for a fall 2012 release.

Lynne is a proud supporter of childhood literacy, and in addition to her many public readings, she has donated scores of books to local schools, hospitals and libraries. She is also extremely excited to be part of the Telling Tales Festival, an award winning family literary festival held at Westfield Heritage Village in Rockton, Ontario.

reid-aimee

reid-aimeeAimee Reid is an author with a background in education and editing. She taught high school English, Music, and Special Education before she began to work full-time as a writer.

As a child, Aimee was a voracious reader and could often be found—curled in a corner, tucked in the crook of a tree limb, or crouched by a book rack in the grocery store aisle—carried away to the world of a book.

Now Aimee sends her own stories out into the world. It brings her great joy to think of other children nestled on a lap or cuddled on a couch reading good books to share.